Comments on: Santa Clarita Day Laborer Crackdown http://www.immigrationwatchdog.com/?p=590 Sat, 06 May 2006 19:09:51 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=1.5.1.2 by: Cammy http://www.immigrationwatchdog.com/?p=590#comment-573 Tue, 28 Feb 2006 03:41:57 +0000 http://www.immigrationwatchdog.com/?p=590#comment-573 I live in Santa Clarita, and have seen the problems with day laborers. It's not just an issue of having them stand on the corner, but most of them have moved into my (once nice) neighborhood. Out of the twelve houses on my block, four of them have 30+ people packed into their homes. These are not "aunts" or "uncles", but people who pay money to be packed in like sardines. In the meantime, the owners of these homes (fellow Mexicans who may/may not live in the home) are making tons of money under the table. Who suffers? Those of us forced to live next door to them. There have been stabbings, children molested, there's prostitution going on in one home, and the neighborhood as gone to pot. In addition there are the logistics involved in quadrupling the density of people in one tiny cul-de-sac--there's no parking, there's constant traffic, strange people coming and going, and a definite sense of "there are more of us than you, and we can do whatever we want to, because the city won't". It's frustrating that they are illegal, don't pay taxes, and (in most cases) live on welfare (fact, not assumption) in addition to working for cash. I, as a legal law-abiding tax paying citizen, have fewer rights and less say so in my government than they do. Can someone PLEASE tell me why/how that is?????????? I live in Santa Clarita, and have seen the problems with day laborers. It’s not just an issue of having them stand on the corner, but most of them have moved into my (once nice) neighborhood. Out of the twelve houses on my block, four of them have 30+ people packed into their homes. These are not “aunts” or “uncles”, but people who pay money to be packed in like sardines. In the meantime, the owners of these homes (fellow Mexicans who may/may not live in the home) are making tons of money under the table. Who suffers? Those of us forced to live next door to them. There have been stabbings, children molested, there’s prostitution going on in one home, and the neighborhood as gone to pot. In addition there are the logistics involved in quadrupling the density of people in one tiny cul-de-sac–there’s no parking, there’s constant traffic, strange people coming and going, and a definite sense of “there are more of us than you, and we can do whatever we want to, because the city won’t”. It’s frustrating that they are illegal, don’t pay taxes, and (in most cases) live on welfare (fact, not assumption) in addition to working for cash. I, as a legal law-abiding tax paying citizen, have fewer rights and less say so in my government than they do. Can someone PLEASE tell me why/how that is??????????

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by: contessa http://www.immigrationwatchdog.com/?p=590#comment-374 Sat, 28 Jan 2006 13:25:05 +0000 http://www.immigrationwatchdog.com/?p=590#comment-374 As an attorney, there is nothing illegal about passing and enforcing an ordinance that requires all vendors and subcontractors/contractors hired by a municipality to certify that they hire only workers legally eligible to work in the United States and make those contracts immediately subject to cancellation if the vendor is found to have used illegal workers. They might also consider barring any vendors who violate this provision from future contracts with the municipality for a number of years. As an attorney, there is nothing illegal about passing and enforcing an ordinance that requires all vendors and subcontractors/contractors hired by a municipality to certify that they hire only workers legally eligible to work in the United States and make those contracts immediately subject to cancellation if the vendor is found to have used illegal workers. They might also consider barring any vendors who violate this provision from future contracts with the municipality for a number of years.

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